Northern Cheyenne Justice Center

Northern Cheyenne Justice Center

Master Plan & Conceptual Design

Client: Northern Cheyenne Tribe
Cost: $19,511,075 Construction Estimate
Size:  73,533 sf; total complex; 68-bed Adult Jail +  Courthouse + Police
Use:  Tribal Justice Center

Justice Solutions Group (JSG) was retained to develop a Master Plan for the Northern Cheyenne Justice Center (NCJC).  The proposed Justice Center will incorporate three major functional components;

  • Secure Detention (Adult);
  • Tribal Courts and Court Services; and
  • Law Enforcement
     

By locating these and related programs and services in a single facility, tribal authorities hope to achieve enhanced operational efficiency and improved communication and coordination between all agencies.  In addition, close proximity of services in a compact structure will provide opportunities for using shared space and for developing space for public-oriented activities that might not otherwise be available.  The ability to engage families, to involve them in solving problems, to provide treatment and education to all who need it as a means to healing and improved lives in the community… these are the larger goals envisioned for the proposed facility. 

Tribal authorities have indicated that the new Justice Center, while responding to the need for a safe and easily managed facility, should also contribute to more effective intervention in the lives of all tribal members involved in the justice system.  The ability to engage families, to involve them in solving problems, to provide treatment and education to all who need it as a means to healing and improved lives in the community… these are the larger goals envisioned for the proposed facility.  Space to accomplish these purposes and more are indicated in both the Courts and Detention areas.

The planning team recognizes the importance of providing a physical environment sensitive to cultural priorities.  Continuing planning efforts will focus on defining essential cultural and spiritual needs and traditions, and on the best methods of incorporating appropriate environmental and program features responsive to these needs.